Category Archives: Clarence Kailin Chapter 25

Highground Education Days at The Highground Veterans Memorial Park with Special Presentations on The Dove Mound by Chapter 25 Founding Member David Giffey

Veterans For Peace Chapter 25 member David Giffey met approximately 300 Central Wisconsin public and private school student at The Highground Veterans Memorial Park near Neillsville, Clark County, on Tuesday and Wednesday, October 2 and 3, during Highground Education Days. The children receive tours of the Highground site during Education Days. Giffey designed the Mourning Dove Effigy Mound, seen in background, and supervised its construction in 1989. This photo shows a table with information used during the tours. A brief history of Native American effigy mounds and stories about the ceremonial pipe, on red cloth on table, were shared by Giffey with the students.
Middle school students from St. Mary’s, Amherst, are pictured near the Mourning Dove Effigy Mound at the Highground. The student at front right is shown holding David Giffey’s original drawing of the mourning dove effigy mound which he designed in 1986.

Fifth grade students from the Clark County cities of Colby and Loyal are pictured standing atop the Mourning Dove Effigy Mound during Education Days at The Highground Veterans’ Park near Neillsville.

From left, Carla, Allison and Lily, are shown after they scattered soil they brought to the Mourning Dove Effigy Mound from their homes in the City of Colby when they visited the Highground during Education days.
Amherst public school 5th grade students rest on the Mourning Dove Effigy Mound during Education Days at The Highground. Their teacher, Ms. Lutz, and a chaperone are pictured in middle row at left.
A class from the villages of Merrillan, Alma Center and Humbird rested October 3 on the Mourning Dove Effigy Mound as they toured the Highground in Clark County.
(Photos by David Giffey)

30th Anniversary of Highground Veterans Memorial Park

Saturday will mark the 30th anniversary of the establishment of the Highground Veterans Memorial Park at Neillsville.

The anniversary will be marked with all day activities:

30th Anniversary Celebration of The Highground Veterans Memorial Park

The Highground Veterans Memorial Park near Neillsville was dedicated in 1988. A celebration commemorating its 30th year will be held Saturday.

Admission is free and parking will be available at the Clark County Fairgrounds in Neillsville along with free shuttle bus service to The Highground.

Here is the schedule of the day’s events:

Noon: A veterans’ yellow ribbon motorcade through Neillsville and ending at The Highground just west of the city.

1:30 p.m.: An UH-1H Huey helicopter will land at the park.

1:45 p.m.: A Missing Man Table Ceremony that honors prisoners of war and those missing in action with each item at and around the dining table having specific meaning.

2 p.m.: Main ceremony that will include keynote speaker Dick Leinenkugel, a senior White House adviser for the Department of Veterans Affairs, a former U.S. Marine and one time president of the Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing Co. in Chippewa Falls.

4-8p.m.: Chicken dinner and music

8:15 p.m.: Fireworks

More information can be found at www.thehighground.us or by calling 715-743-4224.

An important component of the mission to further peace education has always been the Dove Mound, created heart and soul by David Giffey, a founding member of Chapter 25 Veterans for Peace.

The story of the Dove Mound creation will follow in a separate post.

 

Rousing Peace Rally at Gates of Heaven During Hottest Memorial Day on Record

 By David Giffey

Alfred McCoy’s newest book concludes with five scenarios for the potential end of U.S. global hegemony. The book was McCoy’s topic as guest speaker at the annual Veterans for Peace May 28 afternoon rally at the Gates of Heaven.

McCoy’s sobering, realistic, and carefully researched presentation described historical evidence of empires built and undone. While identifying aspects of a declining “American Century” [of U.S. hegemony] as signaling an end to an American Empire, he also noted positive results of the “American Century” including formation of the United Nations and the World Health Organization, and global advances in human rights.

(Note to readers: “hegemony” may be defined as “domination” or “control.” In McCoy’s usage, “hegemony” may also be substituted for “empire” or “the American Century.”)

In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of U.S. Global Power, (Haymarket Books 2017) is McCoy’s newest book. He wrote to end the final chapter, “Now that the American Century is ending, we can only wonder what kind of shadow it will cast across the globe for future generations.” His presentation at the peace rally posed a similar question.

The American Century is described by McCoy as beginning around the time of WW II. Five scenarios detailed by the author as potentially ending the American Century by 2040 include an evolving world order, economic decline, military misadventure, World War III, and climate change. Climate change, McCoy writes, “…is on such a clear scientific trajectory that there is no need for speculation about its impact…world power would silently shift away from Washington by sheer force of geopolitics and ‘extreme weather’.”

Sharing the peace rally program was Progressive magazine publisher Norman Stockwell, who told the audience of more than 100 about his recent return trip to Vietnam and the ongoing efforts and successes of Madison Quakers Inc. (MQI) and director Mike Boehm. Micro-credit loans, compassion houses, primary schools, My Lai Peace Park, and drilling of water wells are among projects headed by Boehm and MQI over the past decades in Quang Ngai Province.

Father David Couper is an ordained Episcopal priest, author, former Madison police chief and member of Veterans for Peace. Couper spoke during the peace rally about his path to nonviolence, and ended his invocation with a poem.

During the program, seniors from six area high schools were honored as winners of 2018 cash scholarships in the Chapter 25 essay contest. Since the program began 11 years ago, close to 200 student essays have been submitted by scholarship applicants from high schools in Madison, Spring Green, Dodgeville, Muscoda, Richland Center, Baraboo and Boscobel. Student essays are written on topics of peace and nonviolence. Attending the peace rally and introduced by VFP member Paul McMahon was the 2018 winner from West High School, Diana Nava. She was accompanied by her mother, Julia, younger brother, Alex, and a friend. Scholarship recipients from other schools in 2018 are: Lily Scallon, Boscobel High School; Nichole Erdman, Dodgeville; Miles Statz, Baraboo; Garrett Prem, River Valley; and Cole Darling, Richland Center.

Diana Nava, 2018 Madison High Schools scholarship winner, and her family.  Photo by Tom Glassel.

Members of Veterans for Peace who have died were named and remembered fondly, including: Clarence Kailin, Joey Camarrano, Jim Ellsworth, Sidney Podell, Dr. James Allen, Jeff Goldstein, Charles Sweet, Dr. Eugene Farley, Joel Gaalswyk, John Oliger, and Ed Garvey.

The rally began with a stirring set of music by the band Old Cool. Band members are Dan Hildebrand, Sandy Nowak, Arvid Berge and Lee Grady. Ending the event was Sean Michael Dargan’s bagpipe music while attendees placed red carnations at the nearby monument to Wisconsin Lincoln Brigade volunteers fighting Fascists in 1937 during the Spanish Civil War. Clarence Kailin, namesake of Chapter 25 Veterans for Peace, was a member of the Lincoln Brigade. His name is listed on the marker. Clarence died in 2009 at age 93.

Attendees place carnations on the Abraham Lincoln Brigade monument in James Madison Park. Photo by Tom Glassel.

Al McCoy wrote of the May 28 Veterans for Peace Rally:

“Although I speak regularly at diverse locations in America, Asia, and Europe, I found myself unexpectedly moved by the esprit of the Veterans for Peace event that makes Madison such a special community. The pride of the student essay awardee, the eloquence of Rev. David Couper’s recollections of witnessing nuclear tests in the Pacific back in the 1950s, and Norm Stockwell’s description of contemporary peace-building at My Lai all came together to make the quest for peace seem not a Quixotic quest, but a matter of political necessity.”


News Coverage of Memorial Day Program

Channel 3000: Veterans for Peace host Memorial Day program at park

WKOW27: Veterans For Peace Holds Rally for Change