Category Archives: Clarence Kailin Chapter 25

Memorial Day Peace Rally and Memorial Mile Exhibit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Veterans for Peace of Madison will pay dramatic attention to the human cost of violent wars waged for most of the 21st Century in Afghanistan and Iraq with the unveiling May 27, of the Memorial Mile along Atwood Avenue at Olbrich Park; and a Memorial Day Peace Rally beginning at 1 p.m. Monday, May 29, at the Gates of Heaven building in James Madison Park.

“The Current Fight Against Fascism” will be the topic of guest speaker Matt Rothschild during the peace rally program, which will include an invocation by priest, former police chief, and Veterans for Peace (VFP) member David Couper. Student scholarship winners will be noted, the band Old Cool will perform, and bagpipe dirges will end the Peace Rally program at the historic stone building, 302 E. Gorham.

Author and commentator Rothschild is executive director of the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, and former editor and publisher of The Progressive magazine. “Clarence Kailin dedicated his life to fighting fascism,” Rothschild said announcing his topic. “Now the specter of fascism is upon us again, and we must fight it again.”

Clarence Kailin died in 2009 at age 95. He was a founding member and the namesake of VFP Chapter 25 in Madison. Kailin was among 2,800 American volunteers in the Abraham Lincoln Brigade who fought Italian and German Fascists during the Spanish Civil War 1936-39. A memorial marker to Wisconsin veterans of the fight against fascism is located near the Gates of Heaven building. Kailin was a lifelong advocate for world peace, saying he saw enough of the horrors of war in Spain. The VFP rally will end as red carnations are placed at the Lincoln Brigade marker while Sean Michael Dargan plays music on the bagpipe.

Deceased members of VFP Chapter 25 will be acknowledged during the program. Also honored will be students from area high schools who wrote winning essays in the chapter’s ongoing scholarship program. Senior students in Madison and Southwestern Wisconsin schools are invited annually to enter the essay contest named after the late Dr. James C. Allen, a long-time Madison peace activist. The essay topic is: “Why I Believe War Is Not the Answer.” This year, more than 30 essays were submitted in the contest.

Beginning two days before the May 29 program, VFP members and volunteers will install a week-long “Memorial Mile” display of more than 6,000 simulated grave markers bringing attention to U.S. deaths in the ongoing Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The Memorial Mile display—May 27 to June 3—will be located along Atwood Avenue near Olbrich Botanical Gardens. Motorists and pedestrians are welcome to examine the display and receive information available at the site. The May 29 peace rally is also free and open to the public.

(Note: For more information please contact David Giffey at 608-753-2199. A photo of guest speaker Matthew Rothschild is attached to this message).

Art Exhibit- Long Shadow: Painted Remembrances of Vietnam

Vietnam war veteran and artist David Giffey’s series of paintings – Long Shadow: Painted Remembrances of Vietnam – will be exhibited August 15 – September 30, 2016, at Gallery 211, located at 211 North Carroll Street, in the downtown Madison College (MATC) campus building.  The exhibition will open to the public during regular gallery hours which are Mon-Thurs: 11am-5pm, Friday: 10am-2pm. An artist’s talk will be scheduled in September at a date to be announced.

Artist and journalist David Giffey, a Wisconsin native and active member of Veterans for Peace Chapter 25, was drafted and worked as a combat journalist in the 1st Infantry Division in the American War in Viet Nam during 1965 and 1966. Giffey’s murals are permanently installed in schools, community centers, public buildings, and Greek Orthodox Churches in the Upper Midwest and in Greece. He has completed hundreds of easel paintings by commission, and designed the earthen effigy mound “Dove of Peace” which was built at the Highground Veterans Memorial Park, Neillsville, Wisconsin.

Giffey’s series of large paintings – Long Shadows – has been exhibited widely including at the Wisconsin Veterans Museum. The Long Shadows paintings are based on photos taken during the war in Vietnam. The Long Shadows series includes six canvases painted from 1991 through 2013. His murals and other paintings are permanently installed in many public buildings including churches, schools, and community centers.

Giffey’s written publications include “Long Shadows: Veterans’ Paths to Peace” (Atwood Publishing), “Struggle for Justice: The Migrant Farm Worker Labor Movement in Wisconsin,” and “The People’s Stories of South Madison.” He is an award-winning journalist and editor.  Click here to view the exhibit flier.

Artist’s Statement

When another generation of young Americans was sent to invade a distant nation at the start of the Gulf War in 1991, I was filled with anger and sadness and began working on the Long Shadow paintings. Photographs I took during the war as a combat journalist with the Army 1 st Infantry Division in Viet Nam inspired images for the canvases.

I made sketches and rough compositional layouts. The large format is comfortable for me since I’ve worked as a muralist for many years. The loosely hanging canvases remind me of the flimsy insecure tents we sometimes used.

I was determined to experiment artistically with my dismal, frightening, and emotional memories of war. But I didn’t anticipate the impressions of bloody explosions, violence, and loneliness that the work brought forth in my mind.

As a war veteran, I’m grateful that I have been able to work as an artist. Art is a peaceful outlet for the inner residue of war. Along with art, the love and support of family and friends, activism for peace and justice, a spiritual path, and writing have come together to make life precious beyond words.

By many standards my experiences in war were trivial. Yet not a single day has passed in 50 years when I am not aware of some aspect, a detail, of the war in Viet Nam. War casts a shadow of trauma. Veterans return home with that shadow permanently attached to their psyches, and pass it along to their families, friends, and communities. The antidote to the contagion of war is peace. But the peaceful cure is repeatedly preempted when young people are sent to another war, which will end only with the death of its final survivor.

David Giffey

Arena, Wisconsin

2016

County Board Honors Atomic Veterans

By Paul McMahon, Chapter 25

On Thursday, July 14, 2016, the Dane County Board of Supervisors unanimously passed a resolution honoring “Atomic Veterans”. Beginning on July 16 th , 2016 and every following July 16th henceforth, Dane County honors the service of those who were victimized by the US government in the name of “safe” atomic weapons research between August 1945 through the passage of the nuclear test ban treaty in 1963 which finally out-lawed atmospheric testing.

The success of the County resolution is in no small manner due to the tireless efforts of Chapter 25 member Lincoln Grahlfs over a great number of years. The resolution was introduced and sponsored by his county supervisor Mary Kolar.

Lincoln Grahfls, Chapter 25 member and Atomic Veteran

Lincoln Grahfls, Chapter 25 member and Atomic Veteran

Chapter 25 commends Lincoln—as well as his fellow “atomic veterans”—for this significant accomplishment. We thank Mary Kolar for her sponsorship and support.

What follows is the resolution, including a summary of the historic plight of the atomic veterans. The resolution was read in full and explained by Supervisor Kolar. (Note: See accompanying photographs taken at the Capitol Lakes Retirement Center two days later, at a program presented by Lincoln.)

County Board Supervisor Mary Kolar, sponsor of 2016 RES-139, Dane County Atomic Veterans Recognition Day July 16

County Board Supervisor Mary Kolar, sponsor of 2016 RES-139, Dane County Atomic Veterans Recognition Day July 16

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2016 RES-139

Dane County Atomic Veterans Recognition Day July 16

Millions have served our country through military service including in wartime. Most came home and continued to serve their communities in the best ways they were capable of. Veterans Day acknowledges the military service of our fellow citizens; on Memorial Day, we remember those who gave their lives that we may continue to enjoy the freedoms of life in these United States.

While many military service members could expect to face life threatening conditions on battle fronts, most were not prepared nor expected to be a part of our country’s experiments with weapons of mass destruction.

On July 16, 1945, in the New Mexico desert, the first atomic bomb was successfully detonated. Three weeks later, on the 6th and 9th of August, atomic bombs were exploded over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Though the bombings precipitated the conclusion of war between Japan and the U.S., reaction to the destruction and unfathomable death toll in the two Japanese cities was overwhelming. There were widespread calls from both scientists and lay persons for such weapons to be outlawed.

Yet, there were elements in our government who were intrigued by this new line of weapons. In a short time, the U. S. Navy called for volunteers to participate in a program to test the effectiveness of atomic weapons against naval vessels.

The number of volunteers fell far below expectations, so personnel were simply assigned to this operation, and many others that followed. Between 1945 and 1963, the United States conducted some 235 atmospheric nuclear weapons tests in the Pacific and the American Southwest.

At least 220,000 American service men and women witnessed and participated in these tests, or served in forces occupying Hiroshima and Nagasaki immediately following World War II. They were exposed to the potentially harmful effects of ionizing radiation in these weapons. Many of them have endured serious health consequences.

These service members, who refer to themselves as Atomic Veterans, are generally proud to have served their country.

They feel, however, that they were forced to be subjects in a risky experiment for which they were denied the option of informed consent.

It is only fitting that their dedication to duty be afforded proper recognition by Dane County and be brought to the attention of all Americans.

Be it resolved that July 16th, in this and ensuing years, be known as ATOMIC VETERNS RECOGNITION DAY.

/s/Sharon Corrigan, Chair

Dane County Board of Supervisors

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